Want to Be More Productive? Work Less [INFOGRAPHIC]

Monday, September 22 2014

In the U.S., working long hours has been the norm for many decades. In the country of the “self-made man” (and woman!), where being successful by putting in “honest hard work” is celebrated as one of the founding principles we all aspire to, is it any surprise that we’ve reached a point where pulling 80-100 hour weeks at the office is worn like a badge of honor? The more hours you put in, the better of an employee you are, and the more likely you are to get ahead, right?

20140922-fta-clock-downtownWrong. Working endless hours may be nothing more than a waste of time.

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Germany is among the countries with the shortest workweeks, with employees averaging 35 hours a week at the office, but it also tops out as the most productive nation in the world, according to the infographic below, generated by cloud-based software company PGi.

Research actually shows that the marginal benefit of each hour worked on a country’s gross domestic product declines pretty steadily as the number of hours increase, according to the infographic.

How many hours are you working a week? Could you be spending your time more wisely? How many hours are your employees working per week? Do they need to be working that many hours?

Check out the infographic below for additional data on global productivity and some tips on how to maximize your efficiency.

 20140922-fta-working-endless-hours-does-not-make-you-hero-infographic

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2 Comments
  • Quenby Wilcox
    It seems to me, after having returned to the work force after a prolonged absence, that one of the fundamental problems to high productivity amongst people is the lack of ability to organize and prioritize things 'in their heads.' Also, probably the biggest issue in today's business world, in terms of productivity (or lack of), are the number of meetings that everyone must attend.
    Saturday, Mar 14 2015 4:25:02pm
  • Quenby Wilcox
    Collaborative efforts and communication is essential in good management, however, their comes a point where too many meetings becomes dysfunctional and counter-productive. It appears the American work-force may have hit that point -- perhaps to the point of no return?
    Saturday, Mar 14 2015 4:18:02pm
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